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  • 5 minute or less fluorescent tube light to LED T8 conversion with our EZ Kit, not DRL

    Convert your old T8 or T12 fluorescent tube lights to energy saving bright T8 LED tubes with our affordable easy to install retrofit EZ LED T8 kits designed to work with 1, 2, 3 or 4 lamp fluorescent fixtures. We have seen this conversion performed in 3-5 minutes. Our detailed video guide demonstrates how to quickly and easily install our new double end powered LED conversion kits in existing T8 or T12 fluorescent light fixtures.

    EZ LED T8 kit used in the video.

    Buy the Double End Powered LED T8 Tubes

    Buy the Wire Connector

    Buy the Warning Label

    Buy the Shunted Sockets

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    Tags: led, conversion, retrofit, LED T8 Tubes, Fluorescent to LED

  • LED Christmas Lights various styles and colors

    LED Christmas LightsWe have recently added LED Christmas lights to our vast lighting offering. Available in a variety of bulb sizes, bulb styles, bulb colors and wire colors, our premium quality vibrant LED Christmas lights are sure to brighten up your holiday season while reducing your energy use!

    You can rest assure that our indoor and outdoor UL approved LED Christmas lights are safe for decorating your home, yard, business and creative project!

    Come stop by today, beat the Christmas rush and get a jump start on your seasonal project with our affordable, quality LED holiday lighting at factory direct prices!

    Hurry, stock is limited!

    Check out the many styles and colors we offer:

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    Tags: led, Christmas, 5mm, M5, C6, C7, C8, C9

  • LED T8 Plug n Play Tube Installation & Overview Video

    Looking to switch to LED lighting but want to use your old T8 fluorescent light fixtures? We have a very easy solution for you! No rewiring required. It is as simple as removing the T8 fluorescent tubes and replacing with our LED T8 plug n play tubes. Watch the video and see for your self!

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    Tags: led, LED T8 Tubes, LED Plug n Play

  • The new Soraa GU10 MR16 LED light bulb is Here!

    Soraa has released the new Soraa GU10 MR16 LED light bulb and we have all of them. You can get the new Soraa LED GU10 MR16 in 10°, 25°, 36° and the whopping 60° beam spreads to meet your lighting demands.

    Not only can you get the new Soraa LED MR16 in such a wide range of beam spreads there are also available 2700K, 3000K and 5000K color temperatures to get the color you need in your lighting application.

     

    Go check them out by clicking on the links below!

    For recessed lighting go here: http://totalrecessedlighting.com/recessed-lighting-light-bulbs/led-bulbs/soraa-led-bulbs/soraa-2-gu10-mr16-light-bulbs.html

    For track lighting here: http://totaltracklighting.com/track-lighting-bulbs/led-bulbs/soraa-led-bulbs/soraa-2-gu10-mr16-light-bulbs.html

    For bulk go here: http://totalbulklighting.com/led-lamps/mr16-led-bulbs/soraa-led-mr16-lamps/soraa-2-gu10-mr16-light-bulbs.html

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    Tags: led, MR16, Soraa, GU10

  • Unequivocally, the most perfect LED MR-16 you can buy

    MR-16 LED

    We have all waited a long time for technology to catch up to our expectations of the perfect LED MR-16. The wait is over as the SORAA team took performances issues head on in their design and development of this bulb and conquered them all, we might add.

    Here are the top ten reasons why the SORAA LED MR16 lamp is on the top of our list:

    1) Perfect fit. SORAA conforms to the ANSI standard, so they do fit standard lighting fixtures (MR16) when used as specified.

    2) No noise. Performance, performance, performance. These bulbs do not blink, they do not buzz. SORAA lamps turn on and operate properly with both magnetic and electronic transformers.

    3) Fully UL listed. What does this mean to you? It means that you can trust them to work safely as a retrofit lamp in UL listed fixtures.

    4) Dimmable-SORAA lamps work properly with many commonly installed leading-edge and trailing-edge dimmers.

    5) Flexible. The SORAA LED MR16 works in both NEC Class 1 and Class 2 transformers. While most LED lamps are designed to work only with Class 2 systems, SORAA lamps are UL listed for both systems.

    6) Single source light output. Why is this important? The SORAA design allows for a high lumen density which in turn gives you more light output from a single source. Which in turn, gives you more design flexibility and control. Isn't that what you want? A Halogen MR16 lamp have multifaceted reflectors which in turn, do not project crisp shadows as does the SORAA single source light.

    benefits of the SORAA LED MR16

    (left) SORAA single source (right) other LED MR16 multi source

    7) More natural light. SORAA lamps are designed to replicate halogen illumination with one color and one shadow.

     

    8) Elegant (and smart) design. The thermally optimized heat sink (all LEDs are designed to have heat sinks) mimics the Halogen counterpart:

    9) Lightweight. SORAA lamps are the same weight as standard halogen lamps.

    10) Energy efficient. Are you thinking green here? Green as in energy efficient and green as in the money you will save on your utility bill-not just by way of this bulb requiring less energy, but lowering the cost of cooling your space. Here is a chance to make a difference on your carbon footprint.

    Still not convinced? Check out our video here that does a side by side comparison of the SORAA MR16 lamp against the Halogen MR16 lamp:

     

    Total Recessed Lighting currently carries the SORAA Premium and Vivid bulbs.You can find the selection of lamps under our "bulbs and accessories" section in recessed lighting.

    The premium lamp line is the choice for when you want a quality, 'no compromise' LED solution for a 50W halogen MR16 lamp. If you need a high quality output for interior applications that is energy saving, choose the SORAA premium lamp.

    When high color rendering is of utmost importance, the SORAA Vivid lamp line is the lamp of choice. With a CRI (color rendering index) of 95, it will yield rich, saturated colors along with color stability. These lamps are designed to replace standard 50W MR16 Halogen lamps with a savings of up to 75% of the energy that halogen lamps require. Now you not only can choose a superior light quality as well as save on your energy consumption.

    At long last. The perfect LED MR16 lamps has arrived."

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    Tags: led, MR16, led mr16 bulbs, led mr16 lamps, Soraa

  • Convert to LED T8 Lighting from old Fluorescent T8 lighting with our video

    We just completed a new video guide at Total Bulk Lighting on converting your old fluorescent T8 lighting fixtures to modern energy saving LED T8 lighting. We show you the tools required, the LED T8 light bulb kit to buy that includes everything you need from non-shunted sockets to the LED T8 light bulb tube and the steps it takes to go from fluorescent T8 to LED T8 lighting. So sit back and discover how easy it is to go from your old fluorescent T8 lighting to modern energy saving LED T8 lighting with our video guide :)

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    Tags: led, t8 fluorescent ballasts, conversion, fluorescent T8, LED T8, retrofit, video

  • LED, Incandescents, CFL's, Oh, No!! (Or, Watt's Up??)

    image by MolokaiGirl Studio Watts up?

    (Grab your cuppa coffee or tea and sit down with it as you dig in to this article...)

    So, 'watt's' up with the new light bulb law coming into effect in January 2012 (which is named the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007)? Will incandescent light bulbs be outlawed? Will we be 'forced' to buy CFL's (amidst the mercury contamination hubbub) or LED bulbs? Incandescent bulbs will begin the process of being phased out just by virtue of the new efficiency standards that will go into effect. These new standards require that a general purpose bulb that produces 310-2600 lumens of light be 30% more energy efficient. That means that come January 2012, a 100 watt incandescent bulb will not meet these new standards.

    "What do mean lumens?" you say. "What about watts?"  Oh, yes. This gets complicated in the sense that you have to reset your way of thinking about light bulbs (if you haven't already). Contrary to what (no pun intended here) you thought about watts, lumens refer to the measurement of the intensity of light (brightness or light output, if you will), not watts. For some reason, we have been taught to equate watts in regards to how bright light a bulb is. Watts were never a measurement of light output. Watts refer to energy consumption. In regards to a 100 watt light bulb turned on for one hour, the energy used is 100 watt-hours. A 40 watt bulb would use the same amount of energy in a span of about 2 1/2 hours. So, how bright is a 100 watt incandescent bulb? About 1,700 lumens. Pretty darned bright. We'll shed more light on lumens in just a bit (oh, sorry, another bad pun).

    More on watts. Once again, wattage is a measurement of electricity consumption only. It is not a measurement of light output or effectiveness.  Yes, I know I already said that, but it bears repeating since we all have to undo a lifetime of thinking of watts as the brightness of a bulb. A higher wattage does not mean a brighter light. It is good to note that when you apply power to a (bulb) you produce two things: light and heat.  The heat, of course, is an unwanted byproduct. But, how come we are in the habit of thinking of higher wattage as being the brighter bulb? That's because with incandescent bulbs, in order for it to achieve more brightness, it requires more energy to produce that. Which is not the case for LED and fluorescent lamps. They can actually produce a brighter light source with less wattage. Is this starting to make sense now?

    Lumens, Color Rendering (aka CRI), Color Temperature, Candle Power are all measurements made for the visible light output as it relates to the human eye. These are metrics specifically related to how the human eye sees light. Why are there so many categories of light output measurement? I'm not a physicist, but try to think of light as a very complex and multidimensional entity (we're talking about the debate as to whether light is a wave or a particle or both).

    Lumens. If you haven't noticed, light bulb packages now contains information in regards to the lumens of that bulb. It is required by law in this country. Europe has similar practices.  Remember to think of lumens in regards to actual light output or brightness. Personally, in looking all of this gobbledegook up, in my humble opinion, I think lux would've been a more meaningful measure to put on light bulb packages instead of lumens. But that's all I'll say about lux. Let sleeping dogs lie, as they say.

    Color rendering or, CRI-one in the same as CRI stands for color rendering index. In a nutshell, it's the light source's ability to render or reproduce the colors of objects as they would be rendered in natural light. Think of the number for CRI as representing the color accuracy of that light source-the higher the number, the more accurate the color. 100 CRI is the ideal as it represents accurate color rendering. Halogen lights have a  CRI of 100 which is why art galleries, museums and high end retail and jewelry stores like to use them.  Fluorescent, at best, have a CRI of about 80. Which makes me wonder about those fluorescent lamps advertised as 'full spectrum'. Yet, I cannot, for the life of me, find disclosure on what the lamp's CRI is. Logically, full spectrum would equate to the lamp having a CRI of 100. And, as far as I know, the technology for fluorescent bulbs is not in that range. I'm inclined to think that 'full spectrum' fluorescent lamps have a CRI of about 80. The point I want to make here is that a fluorescent bulb being touted as 'full spectrum' does not render color as accurately as a bulb that has been rated with a CRI of 100. If you want/need a light source that gives you accurate color rendering, it would be best not to rely solely on a fluorescent bulb labeled as 'full spectrum'.

    If you are a colorphile or a colorist, insist on knowing what the CRI is for your light source. As far as the term, 'full spectrum' goes, it is just another marketing term that really is meaningless unless the CRI is also provided.

    Color temperature. Not to be confused or not to be used interchangeably with color rendering! I like to think of color temperature as the color quality of the light source. For example, the color quality of  sunlight at dusk is so very different from the color quality of sunlight at mid day. That is what color temperature is. It is expressed in kelvin degrees (K). A  candle flame, sunrise and sunset has a color temperature of about 1,850K, whereas, the noon day sun is about 5,000-6,000K, and an overcast day is about 6,500K. Incandescent bulbs are about 2,700-3,300K. Which is what most of us grew up with in our households and will also explain why, when replacing with bulbs that are closer to the noon day sun, the light in the rooms feels 'off'. Because you simply are not used to being around that color temperature in your home.

    As far as candle power goes, I offer no discussion here (only a pretty picture!) since that form of light measurement is obsolete. I only mentioned it since it is one of the many ways light can be described. You can always click on the link provided if you've become insatiable in regards to lighting terms.

     

    How do we know which bulb gives us the most bang for our buck? Nearly everyone these days are watching what they spend carefully. Comparative shopping is a must. I don't  know about you, but I've spent quite a bit of time in the light bulb section of a store reading the package labels, trying to figure which bulb I needed for my studio space!

    Start off with defining the lighting needs for the area being lit. For my studio space, I need a very bright light source so, pop quiz folks, what will I look for on the package to tell me that? Yes, you're right: lumens. Not watts. Since my studio space only allows for the screw in type of bulb, the compact fluorescent (aka CFL) is my first choice because it is energy efficient and they do come in acceptable lumen offerings (in this case, I chose a 25 watt 1200 lumen bulb). The trade off is that, now my artificial light source does not have accurate color rendering. That is my compromise of choice since I now have an energy efficient and bright light source. I do get a nice amount of daylight through a window, so I am not totally short changed on having color rendered accurately. In fact, throughout most of our home, we use CFL's because they are readily available at affordable prices and last a long time. Believe it not, your CFLs will last longer if you just leave it on. It is not meant to be turned on and off as we've been in the habit of doing with the incandescent light bulbs. Nor do you save energy by turning them off and on (the CFLs). There was a fun demonstration of this on the TV series, "Mythbusters".

    Light bulb manufacturers are not required by law to include information on color temperature or color rendering on their packaging. They are required to include lumens and wattage. But, wouldn't you also want to know what the color temperature is? Instead, you get terms like, 'soft white' or  'cool white' or other variations. Oh, and GE has their own proprietary definition and created their 'Reveal' light bulbs.  Anyway, now that YOU know a little bit more about color temperature, you can make your choices with  more confidence.

    light bulb comparison

    (image from Wikipedia)

    As a consumer, I think light bulb manufacturers are underestimating their audience. As consumers, we should demand to know what the CRI and the color temperature of a bulb is. Why not? And then they can rid themselves of the 'dumbing down' on their packages that say, "25w=75w".  Please, just tell me the lumens, CRI and wattage and I'll be good to go. Although in all fairness, some manufacturers do indeed include more information such as the label on this package:

     

    And, isn't this kind of labeling much more preferred than the old school stuff? With information like this on a package, I don't feel like I'm making a decision in the dark (sorry) and I know that the light bulb will fit my needs in the space I intend it for. Now you are armed with enough information to make those choices between CFLs and LEDs. And, even incandescents if you feel so inclined.

    You know, as the saying goes, this is just the tip of the iceberg-there is still plenty more to discuss by way of LED, incandescents and CFLs, so look for more on this topic in future postings! By now, you've finished that cuppa coffee or tea you sat down with and it's time to move on...

    I'd love to hear your comments and any other questions (and I will entertain lighting article topics). Send me your 'Q's" and I'll send you those 'A's"!  Just leave a comment here on this blog.

     

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    Tags: led, cfls, compact fluorescents, comparison, incandescents

  • LED Tape Light


    We know a lot of people out there are looking for a source on where to get LED tape light. Well, Total Lighting Supply now carries LED tape light! Currently, you'll find it as a kit in our bulk lighting section.  The LED tape light kit RGB comes complete with  components to install a working system with 19.5' of tape light.  Along with the 19.5 feet of LED tape light, the kit includes a LED tape light driver, remote control and connectors. You have everything you need, ready for installation under your kitchen cabinets, cove, or display cases, or wherever else you can think of. We even put together a video so that you can see what the kit looks like, what is in it and how it works. Be sure to check out the video.

    I will confess that even when someone described to me what LED tape light was, it didn't really click in until I saw it for myself firsthand (I'm a visual person). Wow...it is pretty darned cool stuff and the possibilities for its use is limited only by your imagination!

    You are probably wondering what RGB  is? Well, it's nothing fancy, really-R is for red, G is for green and B is for blue. Remember that really brief color theory lesson you had way back when in your school days? The one about the primary colors and how red, green and blue make up all the other colors? That's all that it is. If you want a more in-depth explanation, go ahead and click on the link for RGB and it will take you to Wikipedia's definition (it will open in a new window).

    So, the colors of the LED tape light change because it contains three channels of color that can be 'mixed'. To see the light in action, be sure to check out the video.

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    Tags: indoor led tape lights, led, led tape lights

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